Driving Schools Leeds: When Learner Drives an Automatic Car

Please take note that driving an automatic car needs no clutch. You may take the automatic driving test from Driving Schools Leeds, and you’ll have a great chance of passing if you often put in your head that clutching in this type is no more, and your experience with manual transmission car is already a thing of the past. Also because when you pass your automatic driving test, your driving licence will only allow you to drive an automatic vehicle.

Therefore, if you’re going to drive a manual car, you will need to take a manual driving test. You have to understand this government regulation based on common sense that automatic car is easier to drive compared to manual transmission vehicle, hence the difference in driving licence.

Learning to start, steer and stop is much easier in automatic cars. Your right foot should be used normally to control the accelerator or gas pedal as well as the brake pedal or footbrake. Because there is no clutch pedal, your left foot needs not to be used at all in your driving.

All subsequent changes will automatically be carried out when the initial gear selection has been done. It’s usually taking place when the vehicle is being stopped. They’re regulated by the pressure applied on the accelerator and the speed of the car.

When you’re driving an automatic car, the brake pedal has to be used more often in order to avoid it from creeping forward. Remember that the natural tendency of automatic car is to creep forward. But one advantage is that it enables the driver to concentrate on the more important things, such as steering well and planning ahead.

For disabled or older people, it makes learning to drive an automatic car easier. It’s also easier for learner drivers to learn to drive, but first your instructor should explain about the extra use of the handbrake in an automatic car as well as other techniques being used to control the vehicle at low speed.

But the saying that goes, “Practise makes perfect,” should be inculcated in your mind as a beginner. So, get plenty of time to practise driving with an Approved Driving Instructor (ADI) at your side.

As a learner, you may be curious on what the other beginners’ frequent questions about learning to drive in an automatic car. Here is one: “When I stop at a give-way sign or at traffic lights, do I need to put my car into “neutral” or “park” position or just put my handbrake on, or just simply brake?”

The answer is: From time to time you’ll stop in traffic. On this occasion, you’ll need to make sure that the car is secure. It’s a good idea, whatever type of car you’re driving, to use the handbrake in order to secure the car when you stop for more than a minute. This will help prevent the vehicle from being shunted forward if hit from behind accidentally.

If you’re waiting a long time, you can apply your handbrake and then select the “neutral” position. This will remove the possibility of creeping forward. When you’re parking, use the “park” position right after you stop the car, because this will lock the transmission.

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Leeds, West Yorkshire LS19 7LA

Phone: 01943470202
Email: Contact@r-m-t.org.uk

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Wednesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
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Sunday Closed

Driving Instructors in Leeds: 2015, the Year We All Plug In?

A quotation from a bestselling book goes “The future of planet Earth will see all roads with eco-friendly vehicles, and all places supplied with renewable energy. Then, fossil fuel will become a thing of the past.”

The message of this verse which was published in the mid 1990’s sounds prophetic because it has been starting to realize in our current generation after 20 long years as the world is now going hybrid mad. In fact, the market is currently filling up with hi-tech and low-CO2 plug-in hybrids, and many of them are amazingly brilliant. You can find the best models of these cars in 2015.

Hybrids are happening these days, and most manufacturers of petrol and diesel cars are also getting involved in some way or another in the hybrid mad. These car makers are slotting a big cluster of batteries into their conventional models or even building something from their blueprint. This is the best way in complying with strict European emission regulation.

Then, you can expect many more hybrid models to come. It will happen in accordance with the law of supply and demand. As people are motivated to get involved in the campaign for clean environment to save our mother Earth from further devastation due to climate change, they will shift their mentality into something new and much more beneficial and affordable.

A wider variety of hybrids will also be an advantage to the buyers because it could mean the competition among the car makers is so alive. And if they compete to the max, chances are, the products will be in their highest quality. Hence, the end users take the advantage. Here are some of the hybrid models for the year 2015:

(1.)  Volvo V60 Plug-in Hybrid.  It’s a surprisingly practical choice. It has an impressive sub-50g/km CO2. It’s brisk and affordable.

(2.)  BMW i8.   It’s a genuine sports car thrills wrapped in a space-age body hide clever petrol-electric hybrid tech. 49g/km CO2 means it’s also a super green or eco-friendly vehicle.

(3.)  Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid.  The Panamera hybrid is engaging, quick and pleasingly frugal. 71g/km CO2 and short charge times make it green and practical to boot.

(4.) Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV.  A surprise 2014 hit, this Outlander bests its diesel cousin yet remains a genuine family and 4×4 wagon despite lowly 44g/km CO2 rating.

(5.)  Audi A3 Sportback e-tron. Premium hybrid motoring the Audi way means a plush cabin, decent driving experience and prospect of 37 g/km CO2 and 150-plus mpg.

(6.)  Mercedes-Benz S 500 Plug-in HybridS 500 offers small car running cost and big car feel and no compromises: 100 mpg and 65g/km CO2 should please company car operators.

These hybrids are just few of the coming models in 2015. They’re expected to dominate the sales of cars across UK whilst the campaign of the governments worldwide would be joined in more seriously by concerned individuals, organisations and even private companies in saving our planet from further degradation of its environment due to pollution caused by the emissions of vehicles using fossil fuel resulting to climate change and its devastating effects to humanity.

Real Motoring Tuition

47 Shaw Leys Yeadon

Leeds, West Yorkshire LS19 7LA

Phone: 01943470202
Email: Contact@r-m-t.org.uk

Monday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
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Saturday 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Sunday Closed

Committing to Ultra-Low Emission Vehicles

Committing to Ultra-Low Emission Vehicles (ULEVs) has drawn attention from car manufacturers with no less than the BMW making it to the queue of interested car makers as this type brings significant benefits as well as contributes remarkably to the worldwide efforts in saving our mother Earth from pollution and the devastating effects of climate change.

The BMW has recently renewed its membership in the campaign to go with the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicles. It’s actually the company’s reaffirmation of its commitment to the campaign dubbed as “Go Ultra Low” aimed at increasing awareness of ULEVs among car buyers in the United Kingdom (UK).

BMW is a German car maker whose reaffirmation of commitment to the campaign is now joined by Mitsubishi, Audi and Volkswagen, Renault, Nissan and Toyota. These companies are now working with the government in raising awareness of ULEV’s benefits including government incentives and low running cost.

Among them are the seven members of “Go Ultra Low” that boast their 15 ULEVs. They’re counted across a wide variety of models from family vans and cars to SUVs and high-performance sports cars. This increasing number of ULEV models has raised the appeal of these vehicles to more buyers, and increased uptake remarkably.

Figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) showed that registrations of ULEVs grew by over 300 % or from around 4,000 to 14,518 cars. On the other hand, the BMW’s i3 was voted “UK Car of the Year.” As of February, 2015, BMW has already sold over 1,859 i3s across Britain.

A Transport Ministry Official said that the people in Britain are now seeing increasingly the benefits of ULEVs such as their being easily chargeable at home or on the street and their low running cost. To date, there are already seven manufacturers of ULEVs which are campaigning to show prices available as well as the wide range of models or styles. So, there are even more people seeing what’s on offer and the significant help from the government.

Meanwhile, a BMW Group UK official said their company is proud to be a part of the “Go

Ultra-Low” campaign. So, they’re welcoming the other new manufacturers and go hand in hand to continue to work together with the government in order to remarkably raise the public awareness on ULEV benefits that includes saving our Mother Earth by promoting electric vehicles in the United Kingdom.”

In terms of tax benefits, the government is currently offering up to £5,000 off the current price of ULEVs plus their driving cost would only be at 2p per mile compared to around 10p per mile for a typical diesel or petrol vehicle.

It was learned that the “Go Ultra Low” campaign in the UK is the first of its kind in the world which brings together the consortium of seven car manufacturers, the Office for Low Emission Vehicles, the Department for Transport and the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders.
For more information about the available variety of ULEVs and their cost including the locations of their charge points, interested business users and motorists can visit: www.GoUltraLow.com.

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Leeds, West Yorkshire LS19 7LA

Phone: 01943470202
Email: Contact@r-m-t.org.uk

Monday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
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Thursday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Sunday Closed

Tips From Driving Instructor in Leeds: Avoiding Bad Braking

One of the common faults of the motorists whilst at wheel is bad braking. There are countless of fatal road accidents in the United Kingdom (UK) which were caused by this driving fault, thus it’s imperative for everyone behind the wheel to learn and never to do this anymore to save your own life and the lives of your passengers. This is why you need to learn responsible driving from the best driving instructor in Leeds.

Bad braking also means dangerous driving which is done only by irresponsible motorists on the road. A defensive driver who always prioritises his own safety as well as the safety of the other road users, would often make sure not to do this fault as he’s all aware of its negativity. It may also cause the other drivers behind you to do the same bad braking just to avoid hitting the vehicles in front.

This fault is today’s on top in the league table, and the most common is braking reactively or very late for some situation, making the likelihood that the vehicle following at your rear will ram into the back of your car. Remember that just one bad driver can cause the so-called “Concertina Effect.”

Such an effect occurs if you brake suddenly hard, and the reaction time for those motorists behind you is being slashed more and more which could result to a shunt some distance behind you, who simply did the fault of bad braking.

Another bad braking occurs when it’s causing the brake pedal to go all the way to the floor. If you’re always touching or pressing the brake pedal even if there’s no need to do it at the moment, this will be the result: The more you’ll use the brakes, the hotter the brake fluid will get.

A study showed that the hotter the brake fluids get the more liquid they become. Your brake fluid needs more force to be pressurized in order to make it enough to operate the brake system. So, when it gets hot and thin, your braking may not be able to generate the necessary force to operate the system well.

So, you should check out your style of driving if your brake pedal already goes to the floor and you can’t find a mechanical reason behind this. Make sure that you’re not riding the brake pedals when it’s not necessary. And also make sure always that you have taken off your car’s parking brake before you head out to the road.

The solutions for this driving fault that has been causing countless fatal road accidents are as follows:

(1.) Often try to alert the car or cars behind your vehicle by early applying the brake lights. Upon seeing them, these motorists would be encouraged to increase their following distance from your car.

(2.) Just recall what your driving instructor had been telling you about how to apply the brakes progressively and smoothly. Bear in mind that any “stabbing” at the brake pedal isn’t only dangerous but will prematurely wear your brake pads and brake discs.

(3.) Make sure not to press down the brake pedal when it’s not necessary.

Real Motoring Tuition

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Leeds, West Yorkshire LS19 7LA

Phone: 01943470202
Email: Contact@r-m-t.org.uk

Monday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
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Sunday Closed

Crash Course Driving Lessons Leeds: Theory Driving Test Tips

Are you at the age of 14 and ready to get your provisional driving licence? It’s obvious that when you want an answer to this question, you’re already excited to experience the joy of driving a vehicle. But you shouldn’t be in a hurry as you still need to read this article. With the steps provided herein you can surely study Crash Course Driving Lessons Leeds effectively for your written or theory driving test and ensure a higher chance of passing.

Step 1

Read the books about driving a vehicle. Be aware that there are written books for this sort of test, and you need to be prepared for it. Examples of these books include:

(1.)  The Official DVSA Theory Test for Car Drivers Book

(2.)  The Official DVSA Guide to Driving – the essential skills

(3.)  The Official Highway Code

(4.)  Winter Driving

(5.)  Motorway Driving

It’s worth bearing in mind that reading books could keep your brain active and engaged, preventing it from losing power. Just like any other muscle in the body, the brain requires exercise to keep it strong and healthy, so the phrase “use it or lose it” is particularly apt when it comes to your mind. The more knowledge you have, the better-equipped you are to tackle any challenge you’ll ever face.

Remember that even if you lose everything else such as your possessions, job or money, your knowledge gained from reading books can never be taken from you.

Being knowledgeable, articulate and well-spoken as a result of reading is of great help in any profession. It can be an enormous boost to your self-esteem or confidence. It could even aid in your driving career, as those who are well-read and knowledgeable on a variety of topics tend to get ahead of their chosen profession quickly.

 

Step 2

Make flash cards for the questions you might be asked. Flash cards help the learners to digest new material quickly as they’re effective memory-aid tools. Flash cards can be one of the least expensive ways to study materials for your theory test. You can create flash cards with index cards that are three by five inches depending upon the type of information you need.

Flash cards provide a learner with a portable learning tool. Rather than having to carry around a book or notebook, flash cards allow him/her the opportunity to transport as many cards as they need. So, the portability of flash cards can improve efficiency when learning new material. By taking the cards everywhere, a learner driver can make effective use of his/her time.

Flash cards can eliminate irrelevant material as they only focus on the most important elements of what a learner needs to learn. Since the order of flash cards can be shuffled, they can prevent a learner driver from just memorising the order of the given answers.

Work hard to impress your driving instructor in Leeds. You can do it by often reading many pertinent books, and take some drivers education classes if they’re available. Take notes and read them many times until you get them stuck in your head. However, don’t exhaust yourself with too much studying or don’t end up just whining when it gets hard, rather stop it and just continue the next time around.

Real Motoring Tuition

47 Shaw Leys Yeadon

Leeds, West Yorkshire LS19 7LA

Phone: 01943470202
Email: Contact@r-m-t.org.uk

Monday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Sunday Closed

Displaying “P” Plates

Displaying “P” plates has been done by many new drivers on the road. These novice motorists usually are new passers of driving tests conducted by their government examiners. Many of them are accompanied by their parents, sisters, brothers or friends who are giving them moral support.

If you’re currently one of them, you should make sure that you and the rest of your companions are always safe. Subside your ego by showing to the other road users that you’re new on the road. Don’t make them believe that you’re already a skilled motorist. And the best thing to do this is to display the “P” plates.

Many new and young motorists have developed a high ego and worse, they carry it on their head whilst behind the steering wheel, thus displaying “P” plates which is against their imagination of completely leaving from their provisional status at the soonest time possible, they tend to infringe the provision of the law only to find themselves in fatal road accidents.

The “P” in these plates stands for “Provisional” or “Probationary” which provides information to the other road users that you’re still in the practice stage of your diving career. And the advantages you can get from displaying the “P” Plates are as follows:

(1.) Most people will give you a bit more time and consideration.

(2.) To avoid road accident and loss of lives.

On the other hand, displaying “P” plates may not be enough for your safety during your practice in driving. Since you’re new on the road, you can choose a journey where you have some degree of knowledge of the roads in a certain place. Don’t just fear it. Probably you can practise driving alone around the place where your Driving Instructor had been taking you during your driving lessons.

You can also choose to stick to a route you have previously planned, or you may prefer to keep following the road ahead until you’re well in a new area. But when you do this, always keep a map or satnav device or gadget in your car. Then if you eventually get lost, you can use it to find your way back home.

Remember not to panic if you get lost. Wait until you can find a convenient stopping area then use your maps or satnav device or gadget to find out where you really are, and how to get back soon to where you want to go. If you’re really lost as you have no satnav device or gadget, ask a traffic warden or policeman or you may just call into a service station or to ask any shopkeeper in the place.

Before starting your journey make sure you have enough petrol. If you haven’t yet, remember to fill up early so you’ll not have any problem ahead. Then, let someone know your estimated time of arrival back home or any destination. In some situations it’s wise to lock the doors of your car especially if you’re travelling alone at night.

You can bring a mobile phone for emergency purposes only, meaning you must turn it off during your journey because using it whilst at wheel is a violation against the law.

Book your manual and automatic driving lessons Leeds today!

Real Motoring Tuition

47 Shaw Leys Yeadon

Leeds, West Yorkshire LS19 7LA

Phone: 01943470202
Email: Contact@r-m-t.org.uk

Monday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
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Thursday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Sunday Closed

Driving In Snow

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Before you set out:

Check tyres for adequate tread. Poor tyres will not grip when driving on snow and ice. If you live in an area where snow is common it might be worth changing to winter tyres with deeper tread
Use a good quality screenwash that protects down to at least -35 to prevent the water from freezing. If you don’t, your windscreen wipers could be rendered useless in extreme conditions
Allow more time in the morning to clear car windows and mirrors of snow before setting off
Use lukewarm water or de-icer to defrost the outside of your vehicle. You should never use hot or boiling water
Make sure any auto wiper control is switched off before turning the ignition on as this could blow the wiper control fuse if they are frozen to the screen.

Be prepared for every eventuality by ensuring that your car is equipped with the following: demisting pad, torch (wind-up so you don’t run out of battery), spare screenwash, de-icer, ice scraper, blanket, shovel, phone charger, map and a square of carpet that you can use to put under your drive wheels should you get stuck in the snow. Alternatively, you can buy RAC Recovery Track which will get you out of the snow as well as mud and sand.

Remove snow from the top of your car. Otherwise breaking sharply could cause snow to fall onto the windscreen and hamper your vision or another driver’s.

Do you need to use snow socks?.

The following tips should always be followed when driving in the snow:

It’s important to accelerate gently, use low revs and change up to a higher gear as quickly as possible. You may need to move off in second gear as this will help reduce wheel slip
You may need to leave as much as 10 times the normal recommended gap between you and the car in front
If you do encounter a skid, steer gently into it – for example, if the rear of the car is sliding to the right, steer to the right. Do not take your hands off the steering wheel or stamp your foot on the brakes
If the road has not been gritted, be wary of driving in the wheeltracks or other vehicles as compressed snow is likely to be more icy than fresh snow

Controls such as the brakes, as well as the steering, accelerator and even gear changing should be operated smoothly and slowly
Sunglasses can help to reduce the glare of low winter sun on the snow
Keep your speed down and allow more time to stop and steer

De-icing your vehicle

We recommend allowing about 10 minutes to clear your windscreen thoroughly using a scraper and de-icer if necessary. Don’t forget about the other windows and your mirrors as well … they’re just as vital for safe visibility and are often ignored, limiting your vision, especially at junctions.

Don’t be tempted to pull away until the windscreen is fully clear – it can be dangerous and the Highway Code states it is illegal to drive with poor visibility.

Plan ahead to save time in the mornings, either by putting an RAC windscreen cover on the night before or getting up a little earlier so you have plenty of time to de-ice your vehicle. You can buy everything you need to de-ice your windscreen in the RAC Shop.

Never pour hot or boiling water on your windscreen, otherwise you run the risk of cracking the glass and an expensive repair bill. If you don’t have any de-icer, you could use lukewarm water.

It’s also a good idea to carry a lock de-icer with you to clear your lock. If your locks do get frozen, try warming the key or spraying de-icer or an oil-based lubricant into the lock.

Finally, ensure all your vehicle lights, front and rear, are free from frost and/or snow – a thick film of frost on the lens can affect the intensity of the lights, making it difficult for other road users to see you or your signals.

If you use the vehicle’s heater /screen demister, don’t leave your car unattended while you wait for it to defrost as you run the risk of having your vehicle stolen.

Remember safety comes first, only drive in these bad conditios when it is absolutely essential

Safe driving from Real Motoring Tuition!

Real Motoring Tuition

47 Shaw Leys Yeadon

Leeds, West Yorkshire LS19 7LA

Phone: 01943470202
Email: Contact@r-m-t.org.uk

Monday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Sunday Closed

Leeds Driving Lesson Errors and Their Corrections

There’s a long list of errors in driving a car but the most common should be first identified and must be given immediate corrections to avoid the fatal road accidents. Learn top quality Leeds driving lesson today.

(1.) Tailgating

It is driving too close to the car in front, with the possibility of a rear-end collision especially at a typical slow-down situation such as at roundabouts or other traffic queues. You’re basically not leaving yourself enough distance so you can have plenty of reaction time to cater for any possible situation. As the high speed involved can cause the horror of a multiple pile-up of vehicles, it’s particularly dangerous on a motorway in the United Kingdom (UK).

The correction: Avoid tailgating by applying the so-called “Two-second Rule.” This rule provides a gap of at least two seconds between your car and the vehicle in front. Maybe it’s time again to revive the old mantra “Only a fool breaks the Two-second Rule.”

(2.) Stopping too close to the car in front

This is related to the error number one, but not exactly the same as stopping too close to the car in front, with the possibility of being pushed into it when accidentally you’re being hit by another vehicle from behind. Another common result of this is: If the vehicle in front breaks down, you’ll be unable to drive around it.

The correction: Stop your car for a while and then see where the rear wheels of the car in front touch the tarmac. Remember to leave enough space if you’re following a Heavy Goods Vehicle (HGV).

(3.) Speeding

Controversy often arises when it comes to the question of how dangerous over speeding is, however even the most speed-freak motorist will admit that in certain situation, driving too fast means driving dangerously on the road. It also means the possibility of a front-end collision.

Speed also generates related problems such as the loss of control during heavy braking. If the vehicle is at its limit of performance, chances are you’re also well over your own performance limit even how skilled you are as a driver.

Correction: Stay within the posted speed limits, and use forward observation to identify any potential hazards or anything which may cause you to slow down well in advance.

(4.) Tiredness

Tiredness whilst driving a car or falling asleep whilst at wheel can have the fatal consequences particularly on a motorway. Recent statistics showed that falling asleep at wheel is a much bigger problem than it is being first thought.

Correction: Simple take regular breaks. A 15-minute break for every two hours of driving is today’s best practice. Remember not to set out on a long journey if you’re already tired.

(5.) Blind spot

Driving into the blind spot of another vehicle when its driver doesn’t see your car and pulls out is particularly a problem especially for cars moving behind larger vehicles such as lorries.

Correction: Use the door mirrors of the other vehicle. If in his door mirror, he can see you, also you can see that other driver’s face. Watch out for foreign-registered vehicles which usually have bigger blind spots. Make sure to properly align your mirrors.

Real Motoring Tuition

47 Shaw Leys Yeadon

Leeds, West Yorkshire LS19 7LA

Phone: 01943470202
Email: Contact@r-m-t.org.uk

Monday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Sunday Closed

Driving In Fog

Driving in fog

Driving in fog

Driving in heavy fog is like driving with a blindfold on.

Statistically it’s the most dangerous driving hazard in existence. No matter how important the trip is, it’s not worth gambling your life. By far the safest thing to do if you run into fog is to move well off the road and wait for the fog to lift. However, the simple and safe solution is not always the most practical, so read on to find out what driving procedures should be followed in fog.

driving in fog
What is fog?

Fog and mist are both made of tiny water droplets suspended in air. The difference between them is the density. Fog is denser so contains more water droplets than mist. For pilots, if you cannot see further than 1000 meters, then it is called fog. For most people including motorists though, visibility has to be less than 200 metres before it is classed as fog.

Take particular care when driving in fog, especially at night. Fog can be patchy, going from a light mist to a thick blanket in an instant. Obviously, the faster you drive in these conditions, the less time you will have to avoid danger.

As you enter fog, check your mirrors and slow down. Use your foot brake lightly so that your lights warn following drivers.

Use dipped headlights and fog lights if visibility is reduced so you can be seen. But remember it’s an offence to use high-intensity rear foglights in clear conditions (that is, if visibility is greater than 100 metres). Make sure your main beams aren’t turned on by accident. Main beams direct light up into the fog, making it difficult for you to see. Dipped headlights direct light down onto the road and help other drivers to see you.

Keep an eye on your speedometer because studies show that some drivers acclimate themselves to foggy conditions and unconsciously increase their speed over time. If you can see less than 12 metres (40 feet) ahead, your speed needs to be reduced to less than 20mph.

Use your windscreen wipers and demisters.
Beware of other drivers who are not using their headlights.

If you park your car on a main road, try and get your vehicle completely off the road. You could be rear-ended!

Safe driving from Real Motoring Tuition!

Driving in Heavy Rain

Driving in Heavy Rain

Driving in Heavy Rain

Driving in heavy rain and flooding can be hazardous. Here are some useful hints and tips to help you prepare for wet weather.

Breakdown numbers always increase during periods of wet weather, as the damp causes problems with engines and electrical systems, particularly in older vehicles. If you must drive, there are a handful of steps you can take to reduce your chances of an accident or breakdown dramatically.

Many rain-related breakdowns are easily avoidable as they are often caused by people driving through deep standing water. While cars have improved significantly in technical terms in recent years they are still not waterproof and will break down if they are driven through deep water. This can lead to catastrophic engine failure which will be extremely expensive to put right.

A catastrophic flood-related engine damage incident is typically caused by water being sucked into the engine which causes the engine to lock up and can in turn damage important engine components including piston connecting rods and valves.

This inevitably means a new engine will have to be fitted, but what people generally don’t understand is that it is the owner who is likely to have foot the expensive garage bill unless they can demonstrate to their insurer – like any accident – that it was not their actions that caused the damage.

Before setting off:

Consider whether your journey is essential. If not, can it be delayed until after the rain has subsided?

Plan your journey in advance, taking care to avoid areas which are prone to flooding, and factoring in extra time to allow for slower speeds and potential congestion

Let relatives and friends know your intended route and expected time of arrival and where possible, travel with others

Check that your windscreen wiper blades are fully functional. If both front and back blades are not up to scratch, get them replaced
Make sure you fill up. Using your lights and heaters and being caught in traffic use more fuel than driving in normal conditions

Carry a mobile phone in case you encounter any difficulties during your journey

On the road:

Use dipped headlights so that other drivers can see you more easily
Don’t use rear fog lights. They can mask your brake lights and dazzle drivers behind you

Reduce your speed and leave more space between you and the vehicle in front to account for greater stopping distances – remember the two-second rule

Look out for large or fast-moving vehicles creating spray which reduces visibility

Listen out for local news bulletins to keep up-to-date with road closures, flooding and forecasts

If you break down in torrential rain keep the bonnet closed while waiting for help to arrive, to avoid the electrical system getting soaked

Driving too fast through standing water could lead to tyres losing contact with the road. If your steering suddenly feels light you could be aquaplaning. To regain grip, ease off the accelerator, do not brake and allow your speed to reduce until you gain full control of the steering again

Driving fast through deep water can cause serious and expensive damage

Be considerate to other road users and try not to spray pedestrians and cyclists as you drive through water

Driving In Flooded Areas

The following tips should always be followed for driving in flooded conditions:

Do not attempt to drive through water if you are unsure of the depth – the edge of the kerb is a good indicator

If you do go through water, drive on the highest section of the road

Drive steadily and slowly so as not to create a bow wave in front of the vehicle and allow oncoming traffic to pass first – make sure you have a clear route ahead so you do not have to stop in standing water

Driving at speed may be dangerous to other vehicles or pedestrians and could cause loss of control

Drive a safe distance from the vehicle in front
Never attempt to drive through fast flowing water – you could easily get swept away

Test your brakes after leaving flood water

If your engine cuts out after driving through deep water, do not attempt to restart as engine damage may occur – instead call for assistance and have the vehicle professionally examined.

Safe driving from Real Motoring Tuition!